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Wellness Wednesday 03.25.2020

March 29, 2020

Welcome to Wellness Wednesday, March 25, 2020,

 

If there were ever a time for us to focus on our physical, mental and spiritual health, now is the time.  Amid this unprecedented Coronavirus (COVID - 19) pandemic, it is very important to maintain our health and well-being.  Moreover, health professionals are overwhelmed and cannot see patients for routine appointments or elective surgeries. As a matter of fact, we have to practice 

Social Distancing and stay home!  Be Proactive!

 

 

Lifestyle Changes for Greater Physical, Mental, and Spiritual Health Ministry/Initiative     

                                            

National Nutrition Month –  March 2020

 

Educational, Health, Healthy Food

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Did you know? These six popular foods can add high levels of sodium to your diet.

 

As part of a healthy dietary pattern that emphasizes the intake of vegetables, fruits, nuts, whole grains, lean vegetable or animal protein, and fish and minimizes the intake of trans fats, red meat and processed red meats, refined carbohydrates, and sugary drinks, the American Heart Association recommends 2,300 milligrams (mgs) or less a day of sodium.*

 

Daily suggested sodium referenced below is based on 2,300 mgs/day recommendation:

  1. Breads and Rolls: Some foods that you might eat throughout the day, such as bread, can add up to a lot of sodium even though each serving may not seem high in sodium.
     

  2. Pizza: A slice pepperoni pizza can contain almost a third of your daily recommended dietary sodium. Try swapping in veggies to your next slice.
     

  3. Sandwiches: A sandwich or burger from a fast-food restaurant can contain more than 100 percent of your daily suggested dietary sodium. Try half a sandwich with a side salad instead.
     

  4. Cold Cuts and Cured Meats: One 2 oz. serving, or 6 thin slices, of deli meat can contain as much as a third of your daily recommended dietary sodium. Build a sandwich with fresh vegetables such as lettuce, tomatoes, avocados, and bell peppers.
     

  5. Soup: Sodium in one cup of canned soup of the same variety can range from 49 to 830 milligrams  – more than a third of your daily recommended intake. Check the labels to find lower-sodium varieties.
     

  6. Burritos and Tacos: Taco toppings and burrito fillings can pack a big sodium punch. Choose burritos and tacos that are full of veggies and lean sources of protein. 

Compare labels whenever possible and choose options with the lower amounts of added sugars, sodium and saturated fat and no trans fat and look out for the Heart-Check mark, a simple tool to help you eat smart.  When you see it, you can be confident that a product aligns with the American Heart Association’s recommendations for an overall healthy eating pattern, including sodium. 

*Also, remember serving size makes a difference. Eating double the serving size means you are eating double the sodium. 1,500 mg/d for those who are sensitive to sodium and /or at high risk for hypertension.

 

 

                       March 24, 2020 - Diabetes Awareness Day

 

What causes type 2 diabetes?

Type 2 diabetesthe most common form of diabetes—is caused by several factors, including lifestyle factors and genes.

Overweight, obesity, and physical inactivity

You are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes if you are not physically active and are overweight or obese. Extra weight sometimes causes insulin resistance and is common in people with type 2 diabetes. The location of body fat also makes a difference. Extra belly fat is linked to insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and heart and blood vessel disease.    

 

While we're all looking for new activities to keep us busy at home, the American Heart Association is here to help. They're offering their popular Cooking in Color cookbook free because cooking healthy meals can be a fun way to bring your family together.  

attachment:  AHA Cooking in Color - Digital Edition.                    

 

Be sure to keep up with the impact of the Coronavirus in our area.  Pastor Johnson has an important message on the www.cogbchurch.com Website. You can also go to www.cdc.gov/coronavirus to get up-to-date information about the Coronavirus. This is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation and CDC will provide updated information as it becomes available, in addition to updated guidance.

 

 

Be sure to Exercise>Choose Wisely> Eat Healthy>Relax>Manage Stress> and Pray without ceasing.

 

                                                                                                        

Central Oak Grove Baptist Church, HHI, SC - Pastor Louis Johnson

Diane Neal, Carolyn Campbell, Linda Ferguson, and Duchett Hylton,  Central Oak Grove Baptist Church Facilitators

Lifestyle Changes for Greater Physical, Mental, and Spiritual Health Ministry/Initiative

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